Incidents - 1 of 8

Road Work - Scheduled - 2 Right Lanes (of 3 Lanes) Blocked
Broward on Floridas Turnpike Northbound, At Exit 53: Griffin Rd
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Reported: 8/20/2014 8:53:56 PM - Last Modified: 8/20/2014 9:58:20 PM
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Current Travel times for: I-95 I-595 I-75
I-95 SB - Palm Beach County Line to I-595: 18 miles, 17 minutes
I-95 SB - I-595 to Miami-Dade County Line: 7 miles, 8 minutes
I-95 NB - Miami-Dade County Line to I-595: 7 miles, 10 minutes
I-95 NB - I-595 to Palm Beach County Line: 18 miles, 17 minutes
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Information current as of 8/21/2014 12:21:13 AM

Road Ranger Service Patrol

Road Ranger Service Patrol

 

- dial *FHP (*347) to request assistance


 

The Road Ranger Service Patrol is a service of the Florida Department of Transportation and sponsored by State Farm. Its mission is to provide free highway assistance services during incidents to reduce delay and improve safety for the motoring public and responders.

In Broward County, Road Rangers cover I-95, I-75 and I-595 (monitored and maintained by I-595 Express, LLC). Services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 365 days a year.

In Palm Beach County, Road Rangers cover I-95 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 365 days a year. In Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River Counties, Road Rangers cover I-95 Monday through Friday, from 6 a.m. – 10 pm.

Click on the links below to find out more about the Road Ranger Service Patrol:



Road Ranger Services


 

The Road Rangers continuously rove I-95, I-75 and I-595 (monitored and maintained by I-595 Express, LLC) looking for stranded motorists, roadway debris, traffic accidents, or other events that affect the normal flow of traffic. The following free services are provided by the Road Rangers:

  • Change flat tires
  • Jump-start vehicles and make minor repairs
  • Provide stranded motorists two free local calls
  • Clear disabled vehicles from travel lanes
  • Clear debris from travel lanes
  • Supply emergency gasoline, diesel, water
  • Monitor abandoned vehicles and notify FHP
  • Provide maintenance-of-traffic (MOT) services during incidents

The Road Ranger trucks are equipped, at a minimum, with the following equipment:

  • 5 gallons of speedy dry
  • Cell phone
  • Wood blocks
  • Flashing arrow board
  • First aid kits
  • Gas / diesel
  • Public address system
  • 2-ton jacks
  • Auto fluids
  • Reflective cones
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Flares
  • Booster cables
  • Air compressor
  • Water

To present a professional appearance, the drivers are required to wear uniforms and name tags. They are very courteous and provide excellent customer service. A comment card is given to every assisted motorist, requesting mail-in feedback on their experience. Responses have been extremely positive and the program is a major success. Click here for samples of actual Road Ranger Feedback and thank you letters.

Road Ranger Vehicle

 

 

 

 

Road Ranger Motorist Assist Sign

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Road Rangers assisting a motorist

 

 

 

A Road Ranger performing Maintenance of Traffic (MOT)

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Road Ranger Statistics


 

The growth of the program is illustrated in the number of service assists every year.

Year

Statewide

District Four

2013
374,971
121,438
2012
393,405
129,805
2011
395,516
124,809
2010
351,941
84,462
2009
296,041
68,336
2008
320,207
76,144
2007
354,053
87,725
2006
277,537
82,632
2005
298,776
74,691
2004
342,895
75,815
2003
316,883
66,391
2002
279,525
63,058
2001
198,372
38,065
2000
112,000
35,267
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History

 

In the late 1980s, the service focused on assisting disabled vehicles in construction zones and was first provided in District Four by a contractor at the Department's direction for the expansion of I-95 in Broward County. In February of 1995, District Four started the current form of the Road Rangers, which initially covered the I-95 corridor throughout Broward. Palm Beach County was added in 1997. The program has since been expanded to include all types of roadway incidents; it has become one of the most effective of FDOT's incident management programs. In December 1999, the Department began funding the program statewide. The name Road Rangers was selected from a statewide contest in 2000.


Road Ranger Feedback and Thank You Letters


 

Here are a few of our most recent Road Ranger appreciation letters

June 17, 2014

On Thursday, June 5, 2014 at approximately 8:39am, a major crash occurred at the intersection of SR76 (Indiantown Road) and SR 91 (Fl Turnpike). It involved two vehicles, a SUV and a CMV (truck-tractor combination) that rolled on its side on the east side of the intersection blocking the right lane. Needless to say, not the kind of crash one would wish for the height of the morning rush hour traffic that uses Indiantown Road to get various destinations in the Town and I-95. On that morning, there were several FHP and two (2) Road Ranger units that assisted JPD with various stages of managing the crash scene. For that I thank you, and the FL Highway Patrol. Their willingness to assist, patience at the scene, and professionalism was evident as I asked for and received the assistance necessary to mitigate this situation. I cannot say enough good things about your staff to express my gratitude. Once again, this is a great example of teamwork and willingness to work together keeping our roadway safe for our customer, the motoring public. Please give my thanks to, Mr. Steve Gordon, Truck #471 and the other unknown driver. .

Sincerely
-Lieutenant Miller

June 10, 2014

I just want to say a huge thank you to the Florida Department of Transportation for providing the Road Ranger Service Patrol. I was on my way to work in West Palm Beach, driving along I-95, just north of Exit 71 and a little over a mile south of Exit 74, when something went wrong with my car. I pulled to the left shoulder and within seconds, a Road Ranger appeared out of nowhere. In no time, he changed my tire and sent me on my way, even declining my 'tip'. The incident happened around 8:50 a.m. and I was back on the road at 9:10 a.m. I believe the Road Ranger's name is Kendy and I just want to be sure to express my appreciation for his kindness and assistance. He didn't just provide a service, he did it with so much courtesy--he wouldn't even let me take things out of my trunk or put them back so he could access the spare tire carrier. It's never fun to have a car problem, let alone on I-95 as I'm sure you know that stretch of interstate can be harrowing; thanks to the Florida Department of Transportation and the service provided by Kendy, I didn't even have a chance to have a full meltdown. :-) In fact, encountering Kendy's incredible kindness and my experience with the Road Ranger service made my day even better It's hot out there and I know those guys are working hard, if there is any way to share my appreciation with Kendy and his supervisor, I would be grateful.

Many Thanks
-Kim W.

December 06, 2013

I sent in the post card to comment on my experience with the Road Ranger Service on November 26, 2013 but I feel I need to say more regarding one of the most positive experiences I’ve had this year.On November 22nd I had buried my younger brother and November 24th my stepdaughter ended up in the hospital with a serious medical problem. My wife and I left Southwest Virginia on Monday morning. She was headed to the hospital in Wilmington, NC- I was headed to my daughter’s house in Florida to be the guest of honor for a family dinner that had been planned for a year.My mind was on the “complications” of life and I failed to pay attention to my gas gauge- I ended up on a desolate stretch of I-95 out of gas. I thought it couldn’t’ get any worse than this-and it didn’t!Within 2-3 minutes of pulling over a Road Ranger truck pulled up behind me. Tim Turning came up to the side of my car and inquired if I needed any help. I was flabbergasted- he wasn’t there to make it worse-he was there to help!He was professional, polite, and most important- empathetic. WOW. After giving me some gas we exchanged Holiday Best Wishes and he drove off. It was probably my imagination but I would have sworn I hear-hi to Silver-Away!! The state of Florida has a new ambassador-ME.

Thank you and please extend my thanks to Tim.
- Jim B.


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Contact Information


 

For additional information contact Gaetano Francese at the SMART SunGuide TMC.



Frequently Asked Questions


 

How much does the service cost motorists?
Can I call them if I need help while I'm stranded?
What are the operating hours?
What is the service area?
What happens when a repair exceeds the services offered?
What is my responsibility if I am stranded on the highway?
How did the program come to be known as the Road Rangers?
How can I find out about the service patrol program in other Florida counties?


How much does the service cost motorists?

Motorists are not charged for the service and may also make up to two local phone calls while being assisted.

Can I call them if I need help while I'm stranded?

If you have a cell phone you may call *FHP (*347) for assistance, otherwise during operating hours they should be able to locate you within 30 minutes as long as they are not detained by an emergency.

What are the operating hours?

In Broward and Palm Beach Counties the Road Rangers patrol the highways 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 365 days a year.Treasure Coast Road Rangers patrol Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. – 10 p.m

What is the service area?

I-95 from the Miami-Dade County line to County Road 708 in Martin County, I-595 in Broward County, and I-75 from Miami Gardens Drive to Mile Marker 50.

What happens when a repair exceeds the services offered?

The Road Rangers will move the vehicle to the nearest safe location and FHP will contact another towing service, at your expense, to assist further.

What is my responsibility if I am stranded on the highway?

Pursuant to Florida state statute, Chapter 316.071, Florida's Move It Law requires that damaged and disabled vehicles be moved out of the traffic lanes as soon as possible. If a damaged vehicle is obstructing traffic, the driver of the vehicle must make every effort to move it or allow it to be moved.

How did the program come to be known as the Road Rangers?

In 2000 the name “Road Rangers” was established by way of a DOT sponsored contest.

How can I find out about the service patrol program in other Florida counties?

For more information on the Florida Road Ranger program, visit the State Web site.

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